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This week’s renewable orders

Germany’s Pfalzsolar says it will build and operate a 21MW solar plant at the Borssele nuclear power plant site in the Netherlands, starting work in Q3, for EPZ, the power plant operator, who put out a tender for the project at the end of 2018. EPZ is the largest electricity producer in the region and it began investing in renewable energy in 2003.

Scatec Solar of Norway has grid-connected a 65 MW solar plant in south-west Malaysia in the Jasin District. This is the first of three projects across Malaysia. The new plant is expected to provide 94 GWh a year. Scatec already has another 65 MW project in Malaysia where it operates with local firm Itramas. Its three deals are for Tenaga Nasional Berhad for a total of 197MW for about $293 million.

UK steel billionaire Sanjeev Gupta has effectively given himself his own first 280 MW solar project in Australia having received approval from the state of South Australia at the Cultana Solar Farm. This is part of a series of developments spending A$1 billion on renewable energy at Simec Energy Australia, which is part of Gupta’s own GFG Alliance. The deal is worth A$350 million and generate 600 GWh a year across 780,000 solar panels and will take 12 to 15 months to build.

Denmark’s Vestas has an order for 228 MW of V136 wind turbines from PacifiCorp, part of the 250 MW Ekola Flats wind project, in Wyoming.

Ekola Flats is part of PacifiCorp’s Energy Vision 2020 initiative, a $3.1 billion investment to expand wind power, adding 1.15 GW of new wind resources by end of 2020, plus a 140-mile transmission line to connect wind generation.

Spanish clean energy power company Holaluz will procure power from 500 MW of solar projects to be built by Chinese firm Chint Energy in Spain.

The capacity will be built out three years and requires nearly €350 million investment.

Spain asset developer OPDEnergy has selected France’s Eiffage Energia to build two solar plants with 156.5 MW at energy auctions in Mexico and Spain.

The contract will cover the a 106.5-MW solar farm in Torreon, Mexico and a 50 MW scheme in Merida, Spain using mono-PERC modules of 370 W each and central inverters and single-axis trackers for grid connection.

Enel Green Power has a deal to build a 22 MW battery store in Cremzow, in the German state of Brandenburg at a cost of €17 million. It will be used in Germany’s grid stability, providing frequency regulation to the country’s Primary Control Reserve market.  When the grid’s frequency is threatened by either high or low demand, the battery can react in under 30 seconds, and it will be used to store surplus energy from the Enertrag wind farms.

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