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Published   Riot

Automotive Cybersecurity

A ticking time bomb we may just prevent from going off – smaller car makers lag badly

“Automakers are being all too slowly drawn to modern security techniques to plug the security holes in connected cars. Can this transition happen swiftly enough to avert potential disaster?”

Cars are entering a difficult transition period, as the automotive industry acquires the necessary skills to build secure vehicles that make use of a connection to the internet. Connected cars are truly here, and self-driving cars are just around the corner – but the automotive industry is still years from a standardized approach to securing these vehicles in a hyper-connected world.

Without such a security framework, each car represents dozens to hundreds of potential backdoors for potential attackers – so how much danger does this status quo present?

Automakers are crossing their fingers and hoping that connected cars will not be attacked. They refuse to work together and instead are moving forward with a multiplicity of security strategies which will be weaker than going down the standards route.

For more information contact:

Chloe Spring (Marketing Manager): [email protected]

Office Phone: +44 (0)1179 257019

Download Executive Summary:

Download a copy of the executive summary

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1). Introduction

Recent History

The Paradigm Shift – Autonomous Vehicles:

2). Current Security Approaches

Context

Emerging Tools

Smartphone Apps – a big problem

The Infamous Jeep Hack

The Risk’s Scope

The Lower Stack Layers – Expanding Codebases

3). Industry Perspectives

BlackBerry QNX

Domain Controllers

Today’s Security

The Future

Seven Pillars

Rohde & Schwarz

Optimism

Recalls

Externalities

Lynx

Hardware

The Jeep touch-point

The Automotive Market

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